A Night Out with Fresh Art

Thursday night Mr. M and I left the children (how odd it feels to write that in plural form!) with our sweet nanny and met out at Gallery 80808, where my friend Laurie McIntosh and her sister, Lynn Parrott were showing their exhibition of work that will later travel to Hilton Head Island.

These talented sisters were raised in Greenville, South Carolina with a mother who was a professional chemist and is still an avid painter at age 95.  Their intellectual wit and willingness to experiment with light, color and subject matter shows that they were raised in a household that great opened creative doors for them.

Lynn works in oil, pastel and printmaking to create pieces that convey a sense of belonging to a space.  Her landscapes are inspired by  the South Carolina Lowcountry and North Carolina mountains, two places that have an essence that gets into the blood of anyone who visits them. Standing in front of Lynn's work brings on the magnetic pull of the salty, Charleston-smelling air or the crispy muscle relaxant aura of the Blue Ridge.

FA4.jpg

Laurie's work, 'Unspoken Communication', is all about body language and movement.  In these pieces she seeks to express ideas of particular communications in single images.  It makes for some truly fascinating work that grips the attention, making the viewer pause a bit longer and become more conscious of what they are expressing to others in their physical stance.

“Prima Vista: Fresh Art at Vista Studios” will be on view at Gallery 80808 in Columbia through March 29, then at Camellia Art in Hilton Head April 1 through 22.

FA6.jpg

It was wonderful to be out and about, wearing a nice dress and without baby spit-up in my hair. It was the perfect setting in which to stick my toe back into the social scene and catch up with some old friends.  Mr. M even agreed to go to dinner at Mr. Friendly's afterward, a restaurant upon which we have always vehemently disagreed.  After this visit, however, I think he's finally come around, based on the speed at which the scallops and the mahi disappeared.